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Curry Powder

Nutritional Information

1 tbsp, curry powder

  • Calories 20
  • Calories from Fat 7.83
  • Amount%DV
  • Total Fat 0.87g1%
  • Saturated Fat 0.141g1%
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.35g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.161g
  • Cholestreol 0mg0%
  • Sodium 3mg0%
  • Potassium 97mg3%
  • Total Carbohydrate 3.66g1%
  • Dietary Fiber 2.1g8%
  • Sugars 0.17g
  • Protein 0.8g2%
  • Calcium 3mg0%
  • Iron 10mg56%
  • Vitamin A 1%
  • Vitamin C 1%

Curry Powder Cooking Considerations:

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Curry Powder Storage Considerations:

Curry powder quickly loses its pungency; it should be stored, airtight, and no longer than two months. 


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Curry Powder on Wikipedia:

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2009) Curry powder

Curry powder is a mixture of spices of widely varying composition based on South Asian cuisine. Curry powder, and the contemporary English use of the word curry are Western inventions and do not reflect any specific Indian food. The word curry is widely believed to be a corruption of the Tamil word kari,[1] meaning something like sauce, but it may also be derived from the French cuire.[2]

In the western world curry powder mixtures tend to have a fairly standardized taste, though a great variety of spice mixtures are used in Indian cuisine.

Curry powder was largely popularized during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the mass exportation of the condiment to the western table, throughout Europe and North and South America. Curry powder did not become standardized, as many of the original blends of curry powder were still available throughout the world. The late 1960s and early 1970s saw a large increase of Indian food consumption in the west and internationally. This led to an increase of Indian restaurants throughout the world. The tradition of keeping special blends of curry powder simply became uneconomical, and curry powder became increasingly standardized outside India.

Indian cooks often have readier access to a variety of fresh spices than their foreign counterparts. Some curry cooks will have their own specific mixtures for different recipes. These are often passed down from parent to child.

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Ingredients

Most recipes and producers of curry powder usually include coriander, turmeric, cumin, and fenugreek in their blends. Depending on the recipe, additional ingredients such as ginger, garlic, fennel seed, cinnamon, clove, mustard seed, green cardamom, black cardamom, mace, nutmeg, red pepper, long pepper, and black pepper may also be added.

References

^ Harper, Douglas (November 2001). ``Online Etymology Dictionary``. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=curry. Retrieved 8 November 2009.  ^ ``FOOD HISTORY: History of Curry Powder``. 2 December 2006. http://www.world-foodhistory.com/2006/12/history-of-curry-powder.html. Retrieved 8 November 2009. 

See also

Curry Garam masala

External links

Foodnetwork's Curry Powder recipe This Indian cuisine-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v â€¢ d â€¢ e v â€¢ d â€¢ e Herbs and spices   Herbs

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