Food Guts - Ingredient Information

Ingredient Lookup

Guacamole

Nutritional Information

1 cup, guacamole

  • Calories 366
  • Calories from Fat 300.06
  • Amount%DV
  • Total Fat 33.34g51%
  • Saturated Fat 4.835g24%
  • Monounsaturated Fat 22.282g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 4.131g
  • Cholestreol 0mg0%
  • Sodium 345mg14%
  • Potassium 1109mg32%
  • Total Carbohydrate 19.83g7%
  • Dietary Fiber 15.4g62%
  • Sugars 1.65g
  • Protein 4.57g9%
  • Calcium 3mg0%
  • Iron 7mg39%
  • Vitamin A 0%
  • Vitamin C 40%

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Guacamole on Wikipedia:

Distinguish from Whac-A-Mole (videogame, and House episode). Guacamole

Guacamole is an avocado-based dip which originated in Mexico.[1] It is traditionally made by mashing ripe avocados with a molcajete (mortar and pestle) and adding tomatoes and seasonings.

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History

Guacamole was made by the Aztecs as early as the 1500s.[1] After the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors, guacamole became popular in Spain.

The name comes from an Aztec dialect via Nahuatl āhuacamolli, from āhuacatl (=``avocado``) + molli (=``sauce``).[1] In Spanish, it is pronounced [ɣʷakaˈmole], in American English /ˌɡwɑːkəˈmoʊliː/, and in British English sometimes /ˌɡwækəˈmoʊliː/.

Two U.S. ``National Guacamole Days`` celebrate the dish, Sept. 16 and Nov. 14.

Ingredients

Ripe avocados, tomatoes, onions, lime or lemon juice, and salt are common to most recipes. Lime juice adds flavor and slows enzyme-caused browning. Other common ingredients include cilantro (coriander leaf), black pepper, cumin, jalapeños, and garlic.

Commercial guacamole

Prepared and fresh guacamoles are available in stores, often available refrigerated. The non-fresh guacamole that is most like fresh is preserved by freezing or sometimes high pressure packaging.[2] Other non-fresh preparations need higher levels of fillers and artificial preservatives to be shelf stable.

Kraft Foods received consumer complaints and a lawsuit filed against it regarding its commercial guacamole.[3] The main issue was that Kraft's guacamole contained less than 2% avocado and was filled with hydrogenated oils and artificial colors to try to approximate the consistency and color of avocados, whereas typical recipes might have a minimum of 25% avocado.

Miscellany

Single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy researcher W. E. Moerner coined the term ``guacamole`` to refer to 1/ Avogadro's Number as the molar unit for a single molecule.[4]

References

^ a b c Zeldes, Leah A. (November 4, 2009). ``Eat this! Guacamole, a singing sauce, on its day``. Dining Chicago. Chicago's Restaurant & Entertainment Guide, Inc.. http://blog.diningchicago.com/2009/11/04/eat-this-guacamole-a-singing-sauce-on-its-day/. Retrieved November 5, 2009.  ^ Steve Connor (February 5, 2000), Eureka! Scientists discover how to keep guacamole green, The Independent, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/eureka-scientists-discover-how-to-keep-guacamole-green-726376.html  ^ ``California Woman Files Lawsuit Claiming Kraft's Guacamole Dip Doesn't Contain Enough Avocado`` on Fox News ^ W. E. Moerner, ``High-Resolution Optical Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solids,`` Accounts of Chemical Research, 1996, 29, 563.

External links

Guacamole recipes