Food Guts - Ingredient Information

Ingredient Lookup

Pork

Nutritional Information

1 oz boneless (yield after cooking), pork

  • Calories 54
  • Calories from Fat 30.69
  • Amount%DV
  • Total Fat 3.41g5%
  • Saturated Fat 1.234g6%
  • Monounsaturated Fat 1.515g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.288g
  • Cholestreol 18mg6%
  • Sodium 77mg3%
  • Potassium 70mg2%
  • Total Carbohydrate 0g0%
  • Dietary Fiber 0g0%
  • Sugars 0g
  • Protein 5.47g11%
  • Calcium 0mg0%
  • Iron 1mg6%
  • Vitamin A 0%
  • Vitamin C 0%

Pork Cooking Considerations:

No Cooking Considerations yet. Add some!

Pork Storage Considerations:

No Storage Considerations yet. Add some!

Pork Substitutions:

No Substitutions yet. Add some!

Pork on Wikipedia:

For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). Pork tenderloin served French-style

Pork is the culinary name for meat from the domestic pig (Sus domesticus). The word pork often denotes specifically the fresh meat of the pig, but can be used as an all-inclusive term which includes cured, smoked, or processed meats (ham, bacon, prosciutto, etc.) It is one of the most-commonly consumed meats worldwide,[1] with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.

Pork is eaten in various forms, including cooked (as roast pork), cured or smoked (ham, including the Italian prosciutto) or a combination of these methods (gammon, bacon or Pancetta). It is also a common ingredient of sausages. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork. Pork is a taboo food item in Islam and Judaism, and its consumption is forbidden in these two religions.

//

Etymology

The term as it refers to the fresh flesh of a pig dates from the Middle English, derived from the French porc and Latin porcus ``pig``.[2] It was one of almost 500 French words pertaining to cooking, food or eating that entered English usage after the Norman Conquest.[3]..

History

See also: Charcuterie

The pig is one of the oldest forms of livestock, having been domesticated as early as 5000 BC.[4] It is believed to have been domesticated either in the Near East or in China from the wild boar. The adaptable nature and omnivorous diet of this creature allowed early humans to domesticate it much earlier than many other forms of livestock, such as cattle. Pigs were mostly used for food, but people also used their hide for shields and shoes, their bones for tools and weapons, and their bristles for brushes. Pigs have other roles within the human economy: their feeding behaviour in searching for roots churns up the ground and makes it easier to plough; their sensitive noses lead them to truffles, an underground fungus highly valued by humans; and their omnivorous nature enables them to eat human rubbish, keeping settlements cleaner.

Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products such as bacon, ham, sausage, terrines, galantines, pâtés, and confit, primarily from pork.[5] Originally intended as a way to preserve meats before the advent of refrigeration, these preparations are prepared today for their flavors that are derived from the preservation processes.[6] In 15th century France local guilds regulated tradesman in the food production industry in each city. The guilds that produced charcuterie were those of the charcutiers. The members of this guild produced a traditional range of cooked or salted and dried meats, which varied, sometimes distinctively, from region to region. The only ``raw`` meat the charcutiers were allowed to sell was unrendered lard. The charcutier prepared numerous items including pâtés, rillettes, sausages, bacon, trotters, and head cheese.

Before the mass-production and re-engineering of pork in the 20th century, pork in Europe and North America was traditionally an autumn dish; pigs and other livestock coming to the slaughter in the autumn after growing in the spring and fattening during the summer. Due to the seasonal nature of the meat in Western culinary history, apples (harvested in late summer and autumn) have been a staple pairing to fresh pork. The year-round availability of meat and fruits has not diminished the popularity of this combination on Western plates.

Consumption patterns

A traditional Austrian pork dish, served with potato croquettes, vegetables, mushrooms and gravy.

Pork is one of the most widely eaten meats in the world, accounting for about 38% of meat production worldwide, although consumption varies widely from place to place.[1] Despite religious restrictions on the consumption of pork and the prominence of beef production in the West, pork consumption has been rising for thirty years, both in actual terms and in terms of meat-market share.[citation needed]

According to the USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service, nearly 100 million metric tons of pork were consumed worldwide in 2006 (preliminary data). Increasing urbanization and disposable income has led to a rapid rise in pork consumption in China, where 2006 consumption is 20% higher than in 2002, and a further 5% increase projected in 2007.[7]

2006 worldwide pork consumption Rank Region Metric tons (millions) Per capita (kg) 1