Food Guts - Ingredient Information

Ingredient Lookup

Seasoning

Nutritional Information

1 tbsp, seasoning

  • Calories 11
  • Calories from Fat 2.52
  • Amount%DV
  • Total Fat 0.28g0%
  • Saturated Fat 0.122g1%
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.045g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.072g
  • Cholestreol 0mg0%
  • Sodium 1mg0%
  • Potassium 25mg1%
  • Total Carbohydrate 2.43g1%
  • Dietary Fiber 0.4g2%
  • Sugars 0.11g
  • Protein 0.35g1%
  • Calcium 4mg0%
  • Iron 7mg39%
  • Vitamin A 2%
  • Vitamin C 1%

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Seasoning on Wikipedia:

For other uses, see Seasoning (disambiguation).

Seasoning is the process of imparting flavor to, or improving the flavor of, food.[1]

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General meaning

Seasonings include herbs, spices, which are themselves frequently referred to as ``seasonings``. However, Larousse Gastronomique states that ``to season and to flavour are not the same thing``, insisting that seasoning includes a large or small amount of salt being added to a preparation.[2] Salt may be used to draw out water, or to magnify a natural flavor of a food making it richer or more delicate, depending on the dish. This type of procedure is akin to curing. For instance, kosher salt (a coarser-grained salt) is rubbed into chicken, lamb, and beef to tenderize the meat and improve flavor. Other seasonings like black pepper and basil transfer some of their flavor to the food. A well designed dish may combine seasonings that complement each other.

In addition to the choice of herbs and seasoning, the timing of when flavors are added will affect the food that is being cooked.

In some cultures, meat may be seasoned by pouring sauce over the dish at the table. A variety of seasoning techniques exist in various cultures.

Oil infusion

Infused Oils is another method of seasoning. There are two methods for doing an infusion — hot and cold. Olive oil makes a good infusion base for some herbs, but tends to go rancid more quickly than other oils. Infused oils should be kept refrigerated.

Escoffier

In Le Guide culinaire,[3] Auguste Escoffier divides Seasoning and Condiments into the following groups:

Seasonings

Saline seasonings—Salt, spiced salt, saltpeter. Acid seasonings—Plain vinegar, or same aromatized with tarragon; verjuice, lemon and orange juices. Hot seasonings—Peppercorns, ground or coarsely chopped pepper, or mignonette pepper; paprika, curry, cayenne, and mixed pepper spices. Saccharine seasonings—Sugar and honey.

Condiments

The pungents—Onions, shallots, garlic, chives, and horseradish. Hot condiments—Mustard, gherkins, capers, English sauces, such as Worcestershire, Baron Green Seasoning, Harvey, ketchup, etc. and American sauces such as chili, Tabasco, A-1 Steak Sauce, etc.; the wines used in reductions and braisings; the finishing elements of sauces and soups. Fatty substances—Most animal fats, butter, vegetable greases (edible oils and margarine).

See also

Flavor

References

^ The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition (1989) ^ Larousse Gastronomique (1961), Crown Publishers (Translated from the French, Librairie Larousse, Paris (1938)) ^ Auguste Escoffier (1903), Le Guide culinaire, Editions Flammarion v â€¢ d â€¢ e Herbs and spices   Herbs

Angelica Â· Basil Â· Basil, holy Â· Basil, Thai Â· Bay leaf Â· Boldo Â· Bolivian Coriander Â· Borage Â· Chervil Â· Chives Â· Cicely Â· Coriander leaf (cilantro) Â· Cress Â· Curry leaf Â· Dill Â· Elsholtzia ciliata Â· Epazote Â· Eryngium foetidum (long coriander) Â· Hemp Â· Hoja santa Â· Houttuynia cordata (giấp cá· Hyssop Â· Jimbu Â· Lavender Â· Lemon balm Â· Lemon grass Â· Lemon myrtle Â· Lemon verbena Â· Limnophila aromatica (rice paddy herb) Â· Lovage Â· Marjoram Â· Mint Â· Mitsuba Â· Oregano Â· Parsley Â· Perilla (shiso· Rosemary Â· Rue Â· Sage Â· Savory Â· Sorrel Â· Tarragon Â· Thyme Â· Vietnamese coriander (rau răm· Woodruff

  Spices

Ajwain (bishop's weed) Â· Aleppo pepper Â· Alligator pepper Â· Allspice Â· Amchur (mango powder) Â· Anise Â· Aromatic ginger Â· Asafoetida Â· Camphor Â· Caraway Â· Cardamom Â· Charoli Â· Cardamom, black Â· Cassia Â· Cayenne pepper Â· Celery seed Â· Chenpi Â· Chili Â· Cinnamon Â· Clove Â· Coriander seed Â· Cubeb Â· Cumin Â· Cumin, black Â· Dill & dill seed Â· Fennel Â· Fenugreek Â· Fingerroot (krachai· Galangal, greater Â· Galangal, lesser Â· Garlic Â· Ginger Â· Golpar Â· Grains of Paradise Â· Grains of Selim Â· Horseradish Â· Juniper berry Â· Kaempferia galanga (kencur· Kokum Â· Lime, black Â· Liquorice Â· Litsea cubeba Â· Mace Â· Mahlab Â· Malabathrum (tejpat· Mustard, black Â· Mustard, brown Â· Mustard, white Â· Nigella (kalonji· Nutmeg Â· Paprika Â· Peppercorn (black, green & white) Â· Pepper, long Â· Radhuni Â· Rose Â· Pepper, Brazilian Â· Pepper, Peruvian Â· Pomegranate seed (anardana· Poppy seed Â· Salt Â· Saffron Â· Sarsaparilla Â· Sassafras Â· Sesame Â· Sichuan pepper (huājiāo, sansho· Star anise Â· Sumac Â· Tasmanian pepper Â· Tamarind Â· Tonka bean Â· Turmeric Â· Vanilla Â· Wasabi Â· Zedoary Â· Zereshk Â· Zest

  Herb and spice mixtures

Adjika Â· Advieh Â· Afghan spice rub Â· Baharat Â· Berbere Â· Bouquet garni Â· Buknu Â· Chaat masala Â· Chaunk Â· Chile powder Â· Chili powder Â· Crab boil Â· Curry powder Â· Fines herbes Â· Five-spice powder Â· Garam masala Â· Garlic salt Â· Harissa Â· Hawaij Â· Herbes de Provence Â· Jerk spice Â· Khmeli suneli Â· Lemon pepper Â· Masala Â· Mitmita Â· Mixed spice Â· Old Bay Seasoning Â· Panch phoron Â· Persillade Â· Pumpkin pie spice Â· Qâlat Daqqa Â· Quatre épices Â· Ras el hanout Â· Recado rojo Â· Sharena sol Â· Shichimi Â· Tabil Â· Tandoori masala Â·