Food Guts - Ingredient Information

Ingredient Lookup

Turmeric

Nutritional Information

1 tbsp, turmeric

  • Calories 24
  • Calories from Fat 6.03
  • Amount%DV
  • Total Fat 0.67g1%
  • Saturated Fat 0.212g1%
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.113g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.148g
  • Cholestreol 0mg0%
  • Sodium 3mg0%
  • Potassium 172mg5%
  • Total Carbohydrate 4.42g1%
  • Dietary Fiber 1.4g6%
  • Sugars 0.22g
  • Protein 0.53g1%
  • Calcium 1mg0%
  • Iron 16mg89%
  • Vitamin A 0%
  • Vitamin C 3%

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Turmeric on Wikipedia:

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2009) Turmeric Curcuma longa Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Order: Zingiberales Family: Zingiberaceae Genus: Curcuma Species: C. longa Binomial name Curcuma longa Linnaeus[1]

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae.[2] It is native to tropical South Asia and needs temperatures between 20°C and 30°C, and a considerable amount of annual rainfall to thrive (Materia Indica, 1826, Whitelaw Ainslie, M.D. M.R.A.S., via Google Books). Plants are gathered annually for their rhizomes, and re-seeded from some of those rhizomes in the following season.

The rhizomes are boiled for several hours and then dried in hot ovens, after which they are ground into a deep orange-yellow powder commonly used as a spice in curries and other South Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine, for dyeing, and to impart color to mustard condiments. Its active ingredient is curcumin and it has a distinctly earthy, slightly bitter, slightly hot peppery flavor and a mustardy smell.

In medieval Europe, turmeric became known as Indian Saffron, since it was widely used as an alternative to the far more expensive saffron spice.

Erode, a city in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu, is the world's largest producer and most important trading center of turmeric in Asia. For these reasons, Erode in history is also known as ``Yellow City``[citation needed] or ``Turmeric City``[citation needed]. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian western state of Maharashtra, is the second largest and most important trading center for turmeric in Asia.

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Nomenclature and taxonomy

kingdom | Plantae (plants) phylum | Magnoliophyta (flowering plants) class | Liliopsida (monoctyledons) order | Zingiberales (gingers, bananas, birds-of-paradise, heliconias, costus, cannas, prayer plants, arrowroots, ...) family | Zingiberaceae (ginger family) genus | Curcuma (curcuma) species | Curcuma longa (common turmeric)

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Usage

Culinary uses

Turmeric powder is used extensively in South Asian cuisine. Commercially packaged turmeric powder

Turmeric grows wild in the forests of Southeast Asia. It has become the key ingredient for many Indian, Persian, Thai and Malay dishes, not only in curry, but also in masak lemak, rendang and many more.

Although most usage of Turmeric is in the form of powder from the roots, not merely for color but in case of Indian cuisine more for the medicinal value, in some regions (especially in Maharashtra) leaves of turmeric are used to wrap and cook food especially when on picnic in a field but really at homes as well. This obviously takes place around where turmeric grown, since the leaves are used freshly picked. This imparts a distinct flavor but has medicinal value as well.

In non-South Asian recipes, turmeric is sometimes used as an agent to impart a rich, custard-like yellow color. It is used in canned beverages and baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurt, yellow cakes, orange juice, biscuits, popcorn color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatins, etc.[citation needed] It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is mostly used in savory dishes, as well as some sweet dishes such as the cake Sfouf.

Although usually used in its dried, powdered form, turmeric is also used fresh, much like ginger. It has numerous uses in Far Eastern recipes, such as fresh turmeric pickle (which contains large chunks of soft turmeric).

Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) [3] is used to protect food products from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water-containing products. Over-coloring, such as in pickles, relishes, and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading.

In combination with annatto (E160b), turmeric has been used to color cheeses, yogurt, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broths and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron).

Turmeric is widely used as a spice in South Asian and Middle Eastern cooking. Many Persian dishes use Turmeric, for the coloring of rice bottoms as well as as a starter ingredient for almost all Iranian fry ups (which typically consist of oil, onions and turmeric followed by any other ingredients that are to be included). Momos (Nepali meat dumplings), a traditional dish in South Asia, are spiced with turmeric. In South Africa turmeric is traditionally used to give boiled white rice a golden color.

Medicinal uses

Turmeric plant Main article: Curcumin

In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric has many medicinal properties and many in South Asia use it as a readily available antiseptic for cuts, burns and bruises. It is also used as an antibacterial agent.

It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. Pakistanis also use it as an anti-inflammatory agent, and remedy for gastrointestinal discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders. In Afghanistan and northwest Pakistan, turmeric is applied to a piece of burnt cloth, and placed over a wound to cleanse and stimulate recovery. Indians, in addition to its Ayurvedic properties, use turmeric in a wide variety of skin creams that are also exported to neighboring countries. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in